How Georgetown’s GOP mayor became a hero to climate change evangelists

By Jonathan Tilove - American-Statesman Staff
Saturday, October 21, 2017

Dale Ross, the mayor of Georgetown, is the subject of an interview conducted by ARD German television. Under Ross, Georgetown became the first city in Texas and one of the first in the nation to claim to be entirely powered by wind and solar energy, a move that has garnered interest from around the world. Claudia Buckenmaier, senior ARD correspondent and her crew interviews Ross. RALPH BARRERA / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Dale Ross, the mayor of Georgetown, is the subject of an interview conducted by ARD German television. Under Ross, Georgetown became the first city in Texas and one of the first in the nation to claim to be entirely powered by wind and solar energy, a move that has garnered interest from around the world. Claudia Buckenmaier, senior ARD correspondent and her crew interviews Ross. RALPH BARRERA / AMERICAN-STATESMAN


Highlights

  • Dale Ross presided over Georgetown as it became the first Texas city powered entirely by renewable energy.

  • Ross, a Republican, has become a hero to environmentalists thanks in part to Al Gore.

  • Ross will be introducing Gore at the GridNEXT 2017 Conference in Georgetown on Monday.


GEORGETOWN — In the 14 months since Al Gore came to Georgetown to see for himself the story of this red Texas city’s conversion to solar and wind power, Mayor Dale Ross has become something of an international sensation.

On Tuesday, journalists from “Weltspiegel,” a popular German foreign affairs TV program, were interviewing Ross, the latest reporters to have trekked to this charming city of 65,000, the first and still only Texas city to operate entirely on renewable energy.

On Monday, Ross, a conservative Republican, will be introducing Gore, the former Democratic vice president and climate change guru, who will be the keynote speaker at the Texas Renewable Energy Industries Alliance’s third annual GridNEXT conference being held in Georgetown, 30 miles north of Austin, for the second consecutive year.

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