ERCOT sets record wind output of 17,920 MW amid wintry weather

ERCOT sets record wind output of 17,920 MW amid wintry weather

Houston — The Electric Reliability Council of Texas set a new wind output record of 17,920 MW on Monday afternoon as a cold front was moving into the area with windy conditions.

The new output wind record was set at 3:32 pm CST Monday and surpassed the previous record of 17,542 MW set in February, by more than 2%, according to ERCOT Wind Integration Report.

US Corporate Renewable Energy Procurement Hits Record Levels

US Corporate Renewable Energy Procurement Hits Record Levels

Corporate renewable energy procurement is currently on track to exceed 5 gigawatts (GW) in 2018, according to figures announced recently by the Renewable Energy Buyers Alliance, which is so far tracking a new record of at least 4.96 GW worth of new capacity already acquired this year.

So far this year (as of October 19) there have been 59 deals signed by US corporates for a total of 4.96 GW — already a new record over the previous high of 3.22 GW set in 2015, and representing the most first-time buyers in a single year.

Georgetown won $1 million to capture and store solar energy. Here’s what happens next


The city of Georgetown is going one step farther to become energy-independent.

After winning a $1 million grant from Bloomberg Philanthropies U.S. Mayors Challenge on Monday, city officials said they plan to lease rooftop space on homes to install solar panels as well as additional space to install storage batteries that will allow the city to collect and store solar-generated energy. Leases will require final approval from Georgetown City Council.

Overheard at TREIA GridNEXT 2018

Overheard at TREIA GridNEXT 2018

GEORGETOWN, Texas — The Texas Renewable Energy Industries Alliance’s (TREIA) 2018 GridNEXT Conference attracted a devoted group of renewable energy developers and marketers to a three-day discussion of how renewable technologies in Texas are transforming the “grid of the future.” Attendees participated in panel discussions on building sustainability with renewables, planning for a resilient system and recoverability, and building community engagement.

Creating A More Resilient Grid Means Using Tools That Put People In The Middle

Creating A More Resilient Grid Means Using Tools That Put People In The Middle

With each passing day, the electric power grid continues the process of morphing into something new we haven’t seen before. This rapid transformation, with hundreds of thousands of assets already massing at the grid edge, will ultimately involve millions of Internet of Things (IoT) connected devices. Add that to the enormous level of intermittent renewable assets that have come on line and will in the years to come, and it implies a whole new way of managing our power grids. It will also require new ways of sorting, processing, visualizing and acting on all that data.

Buying Clean Electricity: How Cities Benefit from Power Purchase Agreements

Buying Clean Electricity: How Cities Benefit from Power Purchase Agreements

A growing number of cities are pursuing actions to reduce their carbon footprint. One of the most straightforward ways to do this is by reducing the carbon intensity of electricity, and as a result, cities are expressing increasing interest in renewable electricity. More than 200 mayors in the U.S. have pledged support for community-wide transitions to 100 percent renewable energy by 2035 under the Sierra Club’s Ready for 100 campaign. Many cities have also set an intermediate goal to decarbonize the electricity powering municipal operations. Municipal customers represent a large market; in a 2017 Alliance for a Sustainable Future survey, 71 responding cities—just a fraction of the country’s cities—report spending more than $1.4 billion combined on annual electricity costs.

Hopping To It: Brewing Beer in Georgetown With 100% Renewable Energy

By Peter Kelly-Detwiler - TREIA Storyteller in Residence

Search the home page of your local craft brewery and see what you come up with.  In all likelihood, you will find yourself looking at a photo of a gleaming stainless steel tap, or massive brewing tanks.  Perhaps a glass of craft beer with drops of condensation glistening on the sides.  Or maybe you’ll see a photo of the owner’s dog (never a bad choice!). 

Chances are, you will not land on a home page that proclaims “Proudly Brewed Using 100% Renewable Energy,” accompanied by a photo of a large wind turbine. Unless, of course, you happen to live in Georgetown Texas, the home of Rentsch Brewery.

A Conversation with Charles Dickerson, COO at Austin Energy and GridNEXT Keynote Speaker

A Conversation with Charles Dickerson, COO at Austin Energy and GridNEXT Keynote Speaker

By Peter Kelly-Detwiler - TREIA Storyteller in Residence


Sometimes a LinkedIn profile tells far less than half the story about a person’s career. That is certainly the case with Austin Energy’s Chief Operating Officer, Charles Dickinson.  LinkedIn can summarize the positions a person has held – and in the electric utility industry, Dickerson has pretty much done it all. But LinkedIn can not adequately describe the how, or the why.
 
In a recent interview for TREIA, Dickerson described the arc of his rich career, some of what he has learned, and what he sees coming next for an industry in the middle of a dramatic transition.